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Green Iguana Terminology

Words And Phrases Used When Discussing Green Iguanas

Arboreal

ar·bo·re·al
1: of, relating to, or resembling a tree
2: inhabiting or frequenting trees

Alligator Roll

al·li·ga·tor roll
This is when the iguana procedes to roll in one direction or another, wildly, to escape being held or during battle as a defensive tactic.

Analgesic

an·al·ge·sic
1: an agent for producing analgesia
2: painkiller

Bask

bask
1: to lie or relax in a pleasant warmth or atmosphere
2: to take pleasure or derive enjoyment

Betadine

be·ta·dine
used for a preparation of povidone-iodine

Ca:P

Calcium to Phosphorus Ratio Abbreviation

CHE

Ceramic Heat Emitter Abbreviation

Cloaca

clo·a·ca
the common chamber into which the intestinal and urogenital tracts discharge especially in monotreme mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and elasmobranch fishes; also: a comparable chamber of an invertebrate

Cold-Blooded

cold–blood·ed
having cold blood; specifically: having a body temperature not internally regulated but approximating that of the environment

Crocodile Roll

croc·o·dile roll
The iguana bites and rolls as a means to escape behing held or as a defensive tactic.

Cruciferous

cru·cif·er·ous
any of a family (Cruciferae syn. Brassicaceae) of plants including the cabbage, turnip, and mustard

Dehydration

de·hy·dra·tion
the process of dehydrating; especially: an abnormal depletion of body fluids such as water

Dewlap

dew·lap
loose skin hanging under the neck of an animal

Digits

dig·it
a finger or toe

Dystocia

dys·to·cia
1: slow or difficult labor or delivery
2: egg binding
Dystocia In Reptiles

Ectotherm

ec·to·therm
a cold-blooded animal

Egg-Bound

egg-bound
unable to pass an egg
Dystocia In Reptiles

Femoral Pore

fe·mor·al pore
holocrine secretory gland found on the inside of the thighs of certain lizards and amphisbaenians

Fibrous Osteodystrophy

fi·brous os·teo·dys·tro·phy
osteodystrophia fibrosa
a lesion of bone in which fibro-osseous tissue replaces resorbed bone. The resorption is caused by hyperparathyroidism which may be primary or, more commonly, secondary to nutritional error, or to renal insufficiency. Called also osteitis fibrosa, osteitis fibrosa cystica

Free Roaming

free roa·ming
uncaged - allowed to roam freely

Full Spectrum

full spec·trum
light that covers the electromagnetic spectrum from infrared to near-ultraviolet, or all wavelengths that are useful to plant or animal life

Gaping

gap·ing
wide open - open mouth

Goiter

goi·ter
an enlargement of the thyroid gland that is commonly visible as a swelling of the anterior part of the neck, that often results from insufficient intake of iodine and then is usually accompanied by hypothyroidism, and that in other cases is associated with hyperthyroidism usually together with toxic symptoms and exophthalmos—called also struma

Goitrogen

goi·tro·gen
a substance (as thiourea or thiouracil) that induces goiter formation

Gout

gout
a metabolic disease marked by a painful inflammation of the joints, deposits of urates in and around the joints, and usually an excessive amount of uric acid in the blood

Gravid

grav·id
distended with or full of eggs - pregnant

Gravidity

grav·id·i·ty
the process of being distended with or full of eggs - gravid - pregnant

Habitat

hab·i·tat
the place or environment where a plant or animal naturally or normally lives and grows

Head Bob

head bob
variable speed up and down head motion

Heliothermic

he·li·o·ther·mic
gaining heat from the sun

Hemipenes

hem·i·penes
one of a pair of intromittent organs of male squamates (snakes, lizards and worm lizards) - sexual organs

Herbivore

her·bi·vore
an animal that only eats plants

Herpetoculturist

her·pet·o·cul·turist
one who keeps reptiles and/or amphibians in captivity

Herpetologist

her·pe·tol·o·gist
a specialist in the branch of biology dealing with reptiles and amphibians

Herpetology

her·pe·tol·o·gy
a branch of zoology dealing with reptiles and amphibians

Hindgut

hind·gut
the posterior part of the embryonic alimentary canal

Humidity

hu·mid·i·ty
moisture in the air : the amount of moisture in the air

Husbandry

hus·band·ry
the activity of raising plants or animals for food

Hyperparathyroidism

hy·per·para·thy·roid·ism
the presence of excess parathyroid hormone in the body resulting in disturbance of calcium metabolism with increase in serum calcium and decrease in inorganic phosphorus, loss of calcium from bone, and renal damage with frequent kidney-stone formation

Hypothyroidism

hy·po·thy·roid·ism
deficient activity of the thyroid gland; also : a resultant bodily condition characterized by lowered metabolic rate and general loss of vigor

Impaction

im·pac·tion
the act of becoming or the state of being impacted; especially : lodgment of something (as feces) in a body passage or cavity

Incandescent

in·can·des·cent
white or glowing because of great heat, producing bright light when heated

Infrared

in·fra·red
1: producing or using rays of light that cannot be seen and that are longer than rays that produce red light
2: situated outside the visible spectrum at its red end —used of radiation having a wavelength between about 700 nanometers and 1 millimeter

Intramuscular (IM)

in·tra·mus·cu·lar
situated in, occurring in, or administered by entering a muscle

Intravenous (IV)

in·tra·ve·nous
situated, performed, or occurring within or entering by way of a vein; also: used in or using intravenous procedures

Jacobson's Organ

ja·cob·sons organ
vomeronasal organ - an organ of chemoreception that is part of the olfactory system of amphibians, reptiles, and mammals, although it does not occur in all tetrapod groups

Jowl

jo·wl
slack flesh (as a dewlap, wattle, or the pendulous part of a double chin) associated with the cheeks, lower jaw, or throat

Lethargy

leth·ar·gy
abnormal drowsiness, the quality or state of being lazy, sluggish, or indifferent

MBD

m·b·d abbreviated term, acronym for Metabolic Bone Disease
Metabolic Bone Disease

Metabolic Bone Disease

an umbrella term referring to abnormalities of bones caused by a broad spectrum of disorders such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium or vitamin D deficiencies leading to dramatic clinical disorders
Metabolic Bone Disease

Mite

mite
any of numerous small acarid arachnids that often infest animals, plants, and stored foods and include important disease vectors

Mouth Rot

mouth·rot
Infectious Stomatitis - bacterial infection of the mouth - often a blanket term for issues on or surrounding the mouth

Necropsy

nec·rop·sy
an autopsy performed on an animal

Neuter

neu·ter
lacking or having imperfectly developed or nonfunctional generative organs

Nuchal Crest

nu·chal crest
1: part of the skull where the neck muscles attach
2: a projection, or projecting structure or ridge, especially one surmounting a bone or its border

Oxalate

ox·a·late
a salt or ester of oxalic acid

Parasites

par·a·site
an animal or plant that lives in or on another animal or plant and gets food or protection from it

Parietal Eye

pa·ri·etal eye
is a part of the epithalamus and is photoreceptive - associated with the pineal gland

Particulate

par·tic·u·late
of or relating to minute - small separate particles

Phosphorus

phos·pho·rus
a nonmetallic multivalent element that occurs widely in combined form especially as inorganic phosphates in minerals, soils, natural waters, bones, and teeth and as organic phosphates in all living cells and that exists in several allotropic forms — element table symbol: P

Phytate

phy·tate
a salt or ester of phytic acid

Poikilotherm

poi·ki·lo·therm
an organism with a variable body temperature that tends to fluctuate with and is similar to or slightly higher than the temperature of its environment : a cold-blooded organism see also cold-blooded, ectotherm

Posturing

pos·tur·ing
the position or bearing of the body whether characteristic or assumed for a special purpose

Prolapse

pro·lapse
the falling down or slipping of a body part from its usual position or relations

Protein

pro·tein
the total nitrogenous material in plant or animal substances

Protozoan

pro·to·zo·an
any protist of the phylum or subkingdom Protozoa

Renal

re·nal
relating to, involving, affecting, or located in the region of the kidneys

Rut

rut
an annually recurrent state of sexual excitement

Salmonella

sal·mo·nel·la
a genus of aerobic gram-negative rod-shaped nonspore-forming usually motile bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae that grow well on artificial media and form acid and gas on many carbohydrates but not on lactose, sucrose, or salicin, that are pathogenic for humans and other warm-blooded animals, and that cause food poisoning, acute gastrointestinal inflammation, typhoid fever, and septicemia

Shudder Bob

shud·der bob head is vibrated quickly side to side while going up and down - warning to stay back

Snalt

snalt
combination of salt and sneeze - iguanas secrete excess salt via snalting

Snout Tail Length

snout·tail·length
length from tip of snout to tip of tail

Snout Vent Length

snout·vent·length
length from top of snout to end of vent (base of tail)

Spay

spay
to remove the ovaries and uterus of (a female animal)

Seminal Plug

sem·in·al plug
hard waxy plugs of seminal fluid and cellular debris that build up in the inverted hemipenes

Sperm Plug

sperm plug
hard waxy plugs of seminal fluid and cellular debris that build up in the inverted hemipenes

STL

s·t·l
acronym - snout to tail length

Stomatitis

sto·ma·ti·tis
any of numerous inflammatory diseases of the mouth having various causes (as mechanical trauma, allergy, vitamin deficiency, or infection)

Subcutaneous (SC)

sub·cu·ta·ne·ous
being, living, used, or made under the skin

Substrate

sub·strate
the base on which an organism lives

SVL

s·v·l
acronym - snout to vent length

Subtympanic Scale

sub·tym·pan·ic scale
large scale below the jowl - Subtympanic Shield

Thermoregulate

ther·mo·reg·u·late
the maintenance or regulation of temperature; specifically : the maintenance of a particular temperature of the living body

Thiamin

thi·a·mine
a vitamin C12H17N4OSCl of the B complex that is an amino hydroxy quaternary ammonium water-soluble salt containing a thiazole ring and a pyrimidine ring, that occurs widely both free (as in the germs of cereals and hulls of grain) and combined (as in yeast and in animal tissues like liver, kidneys, and heart) but is usually synthesized commercially, that functions in the body as a cocarboxylase and is essential for carbohydrate metabolism and for normal functioning of the nervous system, and that is used in nutrition (as in vitamin preparations and in enriching flour and bread) and in medicine—called also vitamin B1

Third Eye

third eye
referring to the parietal eye

Toxic

tox·ic
of, relating to, or caused by a poison or toxin

Tuberculate Scales

tu·ber·cu·late scale
small tubular spikes that protrude behind the tympanum, above the front limbs and can come in a variety of colors

Tympanum

tym·pa·num
iguana ear - can pick up sounds best in the 500 - 3,000Hz range

Ulcerative Stomatitis

ul·cer·a·tive sto·mat·itis
refers to any inflammatory process affecting the mucous membranes of the mouth and lips, with or without oral ulceration

Ultraviolet Light (UV Light)

ul·tra·vi·o·let light
electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays (from 400 nm to 10 nm in wavelength). Though usually invisible, under some conditions children and young adults can see ultraviolet down to wavelengths of about 310 nm

Urates

ur·ate
a salt of uric acid

Vent

vent
an opening for the escape of a gas or liquid or for the relief of pressure; especially : the external opening of the rectum or cloaca

Vitamin D3

vit·a·min d·3
1: cholecalciferol
2: vitamin D refers to a group of fat-soluble secosteroids responsible for enhancing intestinal absorption of calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphate and zinc

Vomeronasal Organ (VNO)

vom·ero·na·sal or·gan
Jacobson's organ - an auxiliary olfactory sense organ that is found in many animals

Attribution

Author: Richard Brooks